Posted by: softypapa | March 18, 2008

Japan Folding Fan – Traditional Bamboo and Paper Sensu

Fan Folding Sensu Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Fan Folding Sensu Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

Description

Old fashioned Japanese folding fan (sensu).  This lovely old fan is made of thin bamboo tines covered with Japanese paper.  The fan is in fair to good condition though the paper is a bit frayed at the edges with some wrinkles and wears a darkened patina of age.  This fan is less than 40 years old and does not include a display stand.

Size:
Length when folded: 8.5 inches (21.8 centimeters)
Width across when open: 14.9 inches (38.2 centimeters)
Weight: 0.8 ounces (22 grams)

Click here to see more Japanese fans!
Click
here to see additional treasures from Japan!

item code: R3S3-0004488
ship code: L1650

Advertisements
Posted by: softypapa | March 18, 2008

Japan Folding Fan – Traditional Bamboo and Paper Sensu

Fan Folding Sensu Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Fan Folding Sensu Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Fan Folding Sensu Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Fan Folding Sensu Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Fan Folding Sensu Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Fan Folding Sensu Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

Description

Old fashioned Japanese folding fan (sensu) featuring the images of eggplant which are an auspicious symbol in Japanese culture.  This lovely old fan is made of thin bamboo tines covered with Japanese paper.  The fan is in poor condition as the paper is frayed with some tears and holes as well as wrinkles and wears a darkened patina of age.  Due to its condition we recommend this fan as a display item only.  This fan is less than 40 years old and does not include a display stand.

Size:
Length when folded: 8.6 inches (22.0 centimeters)
Width across when open: 15.2 inches (39.0 centimeters)
Weight: 0.8 ounces (23 grams)

Click here to see more Japanese fans!
Click
here to see additional treasures from Japan!

item code: R3S3-0003320
ship code: L1650

Posted by: softypapa | March 14, 2008

Japanese Wooden Sake Cup Shichifukujin Luck God Guinomi

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

sharing_sake_sample.jpg

men_enjoyin_sake_sample.jpg 

Description

This splendid high quality wood and lacquer sake cup (guinomi in Japanese) features a hand-painted image of the Japanese Shinto luck god Jurojin.  This god is a member of the group of seven luck gods called Shichifukujin.  This sake cup was made during the mid to late Japanese Showa period (1926-1989) and is in very good condition with no chips, cracks or large scratches and only small marks from handling and use.  The cup was acquired in the beautiful and historic city of Shizuoka, Japan near the foot of Mt. Fuji.  Click here to see more sake cups!

In Japanese folklore the Shichifukujin are the seven gods of wealth, happiness and longevity.  These famous gods (six male and one female) are frequently seen together in Japanese art, often in a boat sailing the seas of fortune.  However, the individual gods actually hail from a variety of religious faiths including Buddhism and Taoism as well as Japan’s native religion of Shinto.  The gods are:

  1. EbisuEbisu is Japan’s god of fisherman and the morning sun.  Ebisu is also sometimes regarded as the protector of small children, a role he shares with the Buddhist deity JizoEbisu is also the only member of the Shichifukujin seven who is of Japanese origin.
  2. DaikokutenDaikoku is the god of wealth, food and worldly success; and statues of this happy deity have for centuries been common fixtures of Japanese homes, particularly kitchens.  Daikoku is also reputed to be Ebisu’s father.
  3. Fukurokujin – Originating in Chinese Taoism this god is the symbol of wealth, happiness and longevity and is usually seen carrying a long staff or cane.
  4. Hoteison – A plump Zen Buddhist monk from China, usually seen with a bag in one hand and a fan in the other.
  5. Jurojin – The Taoist god of long life.  This god is also usually seen carrying a staff in his hand.
  6. Benzaiten – The only female of the bunch.  This goddess is from India and is the patron of music and culture.  She is usually seen carrying an old fashioned Japanese biwa (a type of lute).
  7. Bishamonten – The warrior of the bunch.  This god is originally from India and is charged with protecting people and their treasure.  Bishamonten is usually depicted wearing armor.

Size:
Height: 1.0 inches (2.5 centimeters)
Diameter: 2.1 inches (5.5 centimeters)
Weight: 0.3 ounces (8 grams)

Click here to see additional sake items!
Click
here to see other Shichifukujin items!
Click
here to see more fine-quality Japanese ceramics!
Click
here to see additional treasures from Japan!

More about Japanese sake and sake utensils

Sake has long been an important part of Japanese culture.  In the past, sake was considered a very special item, reserved for only the most important occasions, such as weddings, birth celebrations and other auspicious events.  Sake was considered a sacred drink, and accordingly the first glass poured was always offered to the gods before the remainder could be shared among the celebrants.  Sake can be served either warm or cold and special sake flasks are used to both prepare and dispense this unique Japanese drink.  Sake is warmed either by immersing the flask (already filled with sake of course) into warm water until the desired temperature is reached or through the use of a special sake kettle called a choshi.  The latter method however, though common in old Japan, is today usually reserved for ceremonial events only.  Over time, sake utensils, such as cups have developed their own ritual significance which is still evident in modern Japan.  For example, it is today common at Japanese engagement parties for the man and woman to exchange sake cups as a sign of their mutual intent to marry.  Very beautiful sake cups are also given away to celebrate the birth of a child, as these cherished items are considered symbolic of the significance of the new parent-child relationship.  Though normally small in size, sake cups and flasks have long been used in Japan as a medium for the expression of art and calligraphy.  Hand-painted cups and flasks are highly collectable both within and outside Japan and are eagerly sought after by collectors who value their utilitarian nature and artistic splendor.

item code: R3S6B1R11-0004438
category code: SAKECUP
ship code: L1650

Posted by: softypapa | March 14, 2008

Japanese Wooden Sake Cup Shichifukujin Luck God Guinomi

 

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

sharing_sake_sample.jpg

men_enjoyin_sake_sample.jpg 

Description

This splendid high quality wood and lacquer sake cup (guinomi in Japanese) features a hand-painted image of the Japanese Shinto luck god Hoteison.  This god is a member of the group of seven luck gods called Shichifukujin.  This sake cup was made during the mid to late Japanese Showa period (1926-1989) and is in very good condition with no chips, cracks or large scratches and only small marks from handling and use.  The cup was acquired in the beautiful and historic city of Shizuoka, Japan near the foot of Mt. Fuji.  Click here to see more sake cups!

In Japanese folklore the Shichifukujin are the seven gods of wealth, happiness and longevity.  These famous gods (six male and one female) are frequently seen together in Japanese art, often in a boat sailing the seas of fortune.  However, the individual gods actually hail from a variety of religious faiths including Buddhism and Taoism as well as Japan’s native religion of Shinto.  The gods are:

  1. EbisuEbisu is Japan’s god of fisherman and the morning sun.  Ebisu is also sometimes regarded as the protector of small children, a role he shares with the Buddhist deity JizoEbisu is also the only member of the Shichifukujin seven who is of Japanese origin.
  2. DaikokutenDaikoku is the god of wealth, food and worldly success; and statues of this happy deity have for centuries been common fixtures of Japanese homes, particularly kitchens.  Daikoku is also reputed to be Ebisu’s father.
  3. Fukurokujin – Originating in Chinese Taoism this god is the symbol of wealth, happiness and longevity and is usually seen carrying a long staff or cane.
  4. Hoteison – A plump Zen Buddhist monk from China, usually seen with a bag in one hand and a fan in the other.
  5. Jurojin – The Taoist god of long life.  This god is also usually seen carrying a staff in his hand.
  6. Benzaiten – The only female of the bunch.  This goddess is from India and is the patron of music and culture.  She is usually seen carrying an old fashioned Japanese biwa (a type of lute).
  7. Bishamonten – The warrior of the bunch.  This god is originally from India and is charged with protecting people and their treasure.  Bishamonten is usually depicted wearing armor.

Size:
Height: 1.0 inches (2.5 centimeters)
Diameter: 2.1 inches (5.5 centimeters)
Weight: 0.3 ounces (8 grams)

Click here to see additional sake items!
Click
here to see other Shichifukujin items!
Click
here to see more fine-quality Japanese ceramics!
Click
here to see additional treasures from Japan!

More about Japanese sake and sake utensils

Sake has long been an important part of Japanese culture.  In the past, sake was considered a very special item, reserved for only the most important occasions, such as weddings, birth celebrations and other auspicious events.  Sake was considered a sacred drink, and accordingly the first glass poured was always offered to the gods before the remainder could be shared among the celebrants.  Sake can be served either warm or cold and special sake flasks are used to both prepare and dispense this unique Japanese drink.  Sake is warmed either by immersing the flask (already filled with sake of course) into warm water until the desired temperature is reached or through the use of a special sake kettle called a choshi.  The latter method however, though common in old Japan, is today usually reserved for ceremonial events only.  Over time, sake utensils, such as cups have developed their own ritual significance which is still evident in modern Japan.  For example, it is today common at Japanese engagement parties for the man and woman to exchange sake cups as a sign of their mutual intent to marry.  Very beautiful sake cups are also given away to celebrate the birth of a child, as these cherished items are considered symbolic of the significance of the new parent-child relationship.  Though normally small in size, sake cups and flasks have long been used in Japan as a medium for the expression of art and calligraphy.  Hand-painted cups and flasks are highly collectable both within and outside Japan and are eagerly sought after by collectors who value their utilitarian nature and artistic splendor.

item code: R3S6B1R11-0004437
category code: SAKECUP
ship code: L1650

Posted by: softypapa | March 14, 2008

Japanese Wooden Sake Cup Shichifukujin Luck God Guinomi

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

sharing_sake_sample.jpg

men_enjoyin_sake_sample.jpg

Description

This splendid high quality wood and lacquer sake cup (guinomi in Japanese) features a hand-painted image of the Japanese Shinto luck god Bishamonten.  This god is a member of the group of seven luck gods called Shichifukujin.  This sake cup was made during the mid to late Japanese Showa period (1926-1989) and is in very good condition with no cracks or large chips and only small scratches and marks from handling and use.  The cup was acquired in the beautiful and historic city of Shizuoka, Japan near the foot of Mt. Fuji.  Click here to see more sake cups!

In Japanese folklore the Shichifukujin are the seven gods of wealth, happiness and longevity.  These famous gods (six male and one female) are frequently seen together in Japanese art, often in a boat sailing the seas of fortune.  However, the individual gods actually hail from a variety of religious faiths including Buddhism and Taoism as well as Japan’s native religion of Shinto.  The gods are:

  1. EbisuEbisu is Japan’s god of fisherman and the morning sun.  Ebisu is also sometimes regarded as the protector of small children, a role he shares with the Buddhist deity JizoEbisu is also the only member of the Shichifukujin seven who is of Japanese origin.
  2. DaikokutenDaikoku is the god of wealth, food and worldly success; and statues of this happy deity have for centuries been common fixtures of Japanese homes, particularly kitchens.  Daikoku is also reputed to be Ebisu’s father.
  3. Fukurokujin – Originating in Chinese Taoism this god is the symbol of wealth, happiness and longevity and is usually seen carrying a long staff or cane.
  4. Hoteison – A plump Zen Buddhist monk from China, usually seen with a bag in one hand and a fan in the other.
  5. Jurojin – The Taoist god of long life.  This god is also usually seen carrying a staff in his hand.
  6. Benzaiten – The only female of the bunch.  This goddess is from India and is the patron of music and culture.  She is usually seen carrying an old fashioned Japanese biwa (a type of lute).
  7. Bishamonten – The warrior of the bunch.  This god is originally from India and is charged with protecting people and their treasure.  Bishamonten is usually depicted wearing armor.

Size:
Height: 1.0 inches (2.5 centimeters)
Diameter: 2.1 inches (5.5 centimeters)
Weight: 0.3 ounces (8 grams)

Click here to see additional sake items!
Click
here to see other Shichifukujin items!
Click
here to see more fine-quality Japanese ceramics!
Click
here to see additional treasures from Japan!

More about Japanese sake and sake utensils

Sake has long been an important part of Japanese culture.  In the past, sake was considered a very special item, reserved for only the most important occasions, such as weddings, birth celebrations and other auspicious events.  Sake was considered a sacred drink, and accordingly the first glass poured was always offered to the gods before the remainder could be shared among the celebrants.  Sake can be served either warm or cold and special sake flasks are used to both prepare and dispense this unique Japanese drink.  Sake is warmed either by immersing the flask (already filled with sake of course) into warm water until the desired temperature is reached or through the use of a special sake kettle called a choshi.  The latter method however, though common in old Japan, is today usually reserved for ceremonial events only.  Over time, sake utensils, such as cups have developed their own ritual significance which is still evident in modern Japan.  For example, it is today common at Japanese engagement parties for the man and woman to exchange sake cups as a sign of their mutual intent to marry.  Very beautiful sake cups are also given away to celebrate the birth of a child, as these cherished items are considered symbolic of the significance of the new parent-child relationship.  Though normally small in size, sake cups and flasks have long been used in Japan as a medium for the expression of art and calligraphy.  Hand-painted cups and flasks are highly collectable both within and outside Japan and are eagerly sought after by collectors who value their utilitarian nature and artistic splendor.

item code: R3S6B1R11-0004436
category code: SAKECUP
ship code: L1650

Posted by: softypapa | March 14, 2008

Japanese Wooden Sake Cup Shichifukujin Luck God Guinomi

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

sharing_sake_sample.jpg

men_enjoyin_sake_sample.jpg

Description

This splendid high quality wood and lacquer sake cup (guinomi in Japanese) features a hand-painted image of the Japanese Shinto luck god Benzaiten.  This god is a member of the group of seven luck gods called Shichifukujin.  This sake cup was made during the mid to late Japanese Showa period (1926-1989) and is in very good condition with no chips, cracks or large scratches and only small marks from handling and use.  The cup was acquired in the beautiful and historic city of Shizuoka, Japan near the foot of Mt. Fuji.  Click here to see more sake cups!

In Japanese folklore the Shichifukujin are the seven gods of wealth, happiness and longevity.  These famous gods (six male and one female) are frequently seen together in Japanese art, often in a boat sailing the seas of fortune.  However, the individual gods actually hail from a variety of religious faiths including Buddhism and Taoism as well as Japan’s native religion of Shinto.  The gods are:

  1. EbisuEbisu is Japan’s god of fisherman and the morning sun.  Ebisu is also sometimes regarded as the protector of small children, a role he shares with the Buddhist deity JizoEbisu is also the only member of the Shichifukujin seven who is of Japanese origin.
  2. DaikokutenDaikoku is the god of wealth, food and worldly success; and statues of this happy deity have for centuries been common fixtures of Japanese homes, particularly kitchens.  Daikoku is also reputed to be Ebisu’s father.
  3. Fukurokujin – Originating in Chinese Taoism this god is the symbol of wealth, happiness and longevity and is usually seen carrying a long staff or cane.
  4. Hoteison – A plump Zen Buddhist monk from China, usually seen with a bag in one hand and a fan in the other.
  5. Jurojin – The Taoist god of long life.  This god is also usually seen carrying a staff in his hand.
  6. Benzaiten – The only female of the bunch.  This goddess is from India and is the patron of music and culture.  She is usually seen carrying an old fashioned Japanese biwa (a type of lute).
  7. Bishamonten – The warrior of the bunch.  This god is originally from India and is charged with protecting people and their treasure.  Bishamonten is usually depicted wearing armor.

Size:
Height: 1.0 inches (2.5 centimeters)
Diameter: 2.1 inches (5.5 centimeters)
Weight: 0.3 ounces (8 grams)

Click here to see additional sake items!
Click
here to see other Shichifukujin items!
Click
here to see more fine-quality Japanese ceramics!
Click
here to see additional treasures from Japan!

More about Japanese sake and sake utensils

Sake has long been an important part of Japanese culture.  In the past, sake was considered a very special item, reserved for only the most important occasions, such as weddings, birth celebrations and other auspicious events.  Sake was considered a sacred drink, and accordingly the first glass poured was always offered to the gods before the remainder could be shared among the celebrants.  Sake can be served either warm or cold and special sake flasks are used to both prepare and dispense this unique Japanese drink.  Sake is warmed either by immersing the flask (already filled with sake of course) into warm water until the desired temperature is reached or through the use of a special sake kettle called a choshi.  The latter method however, though common in old Japan, is today usually reserved for ceremonial events only.  Over time, sake utensils, such as cups have developed their own ritual significance which is still evident in modern Japan.  For example, it is today common at Japanese engagement parties for the man and woman to exchange sake cups as a sign of their mutual intent to marry.  Very beautiful sake cups are also given away to celebrate the birth of a child, as these cherished items are considered symbolic of the significance of the new parent-child relationship.  Though normally small in size, sake cups and flasks have long been used in Japan as a medium for the expression of art and calligraphy.  Hand-painted cups and flasks are highly collectable both within and outside Japan and are eagerly sought after by collectors who value their utilitarian nature and artistic splendor.

item code: R3S6B1R11-0004435
category code: SAKECUP
ship code: L1650

Posted by: softypapa | March 14, 2008

Japanese Wooden Sake Cup Shichifukujin Luck God Guinomi

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

sharing_sake_sample.jpg

men_enjoyin_sake_sample.jpg

Description

This splendid high quality wood and lacquer sake cup (guinomi in Japanese) features a hand-painted image of the Japanese Shinto luck god Daikoku.  This god is a member of the group of seven luck gods called Shichifukujin.  This sake cup was made during the mid to late Japanese Showa period (1926-1989) and is in very good condition with no chips, cracks or large scratches and only small marks from handling and use.  The cup was acquired in the beautiful and historic city of Shizuoka, Japan near the foot of Mt. Fuji.  Click here to see more sake cups!

In Japanese folklore the Shichifukujin are the seven gods of wealth, happiness and longevity.  These famous gods (six male and one female) are frequently seen together in Japanese art, often in a boat sailing the seas of fortune.  However, the individual gods actually hail from a variety of religious faiths including Buddhism and Taoism as well as Japan’s native religion of Shinto.  The gods are:

  1. EbisuEbisu is Japan’s god of fisherman and the morning sun.  Ebisu is also sometimes regarded as the protector of small children, a role he shares with the Buddhist deity JizoEbisu is also the only member of the Shichifukujin seven who is of Japanese origin.
  2. DaikokutenDaikoku is the god of wealth, food and worldly success; and statues of this happy deity have for centuries been common fixtures of Japanese homes, particularly kitchens.  Daikoku is also reputed to be Ebisu’s father.
  3. Fukurokujin – Originating in Chinese Taoism this god is the symbol of wealth, happiness and longevity and is usually seen carrying a long staff or cane.
  4. Hoteison – A plump Zen Buddhist monk from China, usually seen with a bag in one hand and a fan in the other.
  5. Jurojin – The Taoist god of long life.  This god is also usually seen carrying a staff in his hand.
  6. Benzaiten – The only female of the bunch.  This goddess is from India and is the patron of music and culture.  She is usually seen carrying an old fashioned Japanese biwa (a type of lute).
  7. Bishamonten – The warrior of the bunch.  This god is originally from India and is charged with protecting people and their treasure.  Bishamonten is usually depicted wearing armor.

Size:
Height: 1.0 inches (2.5 centimeters)
Diameter: 2.1 inches (5.5 centimeters)
Weight: 0.3 ounces (8 grams)

Click here to see additional sake items!
Click
here to see other Shichifukujin items!
Click
here to see more fine-quality Japanese ceramics!
Click
here to see additional treasures from Japan!

More about Japanese sake and sake utensils

Sake has long been an important part of Japanese culture.  In the past, sake was considered a very special item, reserved for only the most important occasions, such as weddings, birth celebrations and other auspicious events.  Sake was considered a sacred drink, and accordingly the first glass poured was always offered to the gods before the remainder could be shared among the celebrants.  Sake can be served either warm or cold and special sake flasks are used to both prepare and dispense this unique Japanese drink.  Sake is warmed either by immersing the flask (already filled with sake of course) into warm water until the desired temperature is reached or through the use of a special sake kettle called a choshi.  The latter method however, though common in old Japan, is today usually reserved for ceremonial events only.  Over time, sake utensils, such as cups have developed their own ritual significance which is still evident in modern Japan.  For example, it is today common at Japanese engagement parties for the man and woman to exchange sake cups as a sign of their mutual intent to marry.  Very beautiful sake cups are also given away to celebrate the birth of a child, as these cherished items are considered symbolic of the significance of the new parent-child relationship.  Though normally small in size, sake cups and flasks have long been used in Japan as a medium for the expression of art and calligraphy.  Hand-painted cups and flasks are highly collectable both within and outside Japan and are eagerly sought after by collectors who value their utilitarian nature and artistic splendor.

item code: R3S6B1R11-0004434
category code: SAKECUP
ship code: L1650

Posted by: softypapa | March 14, 2008

Japanese Wooden Sake Cup Shichifukujin Luck God Guinomi

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

sharing_sake_sample.jpg

men_enjoyin_sake_sample.jpg

Description

This splendid high quality wood and lacquer sake cup (guinomi in Japanese) features a hand-painted image of the Japanese Shinto luck god Ebisu.  This god is a member of the group of seven luck gods called Shichifukujin.  This sake cup was made during the mid to late Japanese Showa period (1926-1989) and is in very good condition with no chips, cracks or large scratches and only small marks from handling and use.  The cup was acquired in the beautiful and historic city of Shizuoka, Japan near the foot of Mt. Fuji.  Click here to see more sake cups!

In Japanese folklore the Shichifukujin are the seven gods of wealth, happiness and longevity.  These famous gods (six male and one female) are frequently seen together in Japanese art, often in a boat sailing the seas of fortune.  However, the individual gods actually hail from a variety of religious faiths including Buddhism and Taoism as well as Japan’s native religion of Shinto.  The gods are:

  1. EbisuEbisu is Japan’s god of fisherman and the morning sun.  Ebisu is also sometimes regarded as the protector of small children, a role he shares with the Buddhist deity JizoEbisu is also the only member of the Shichifukujin seven who is of Japanese origin.
  2. DaikokutenDaikoku is the god of wealth, food and worldly success; and statues of this happy deity have for centuries been common fixtures of Japanese homes, particularly kitchens.  Daikoku is also reputed to be Ebisu’s father.
  3. Fukurokujin – Originating in Chinese Taoism this god is the symbol of wealth, happiness and longevity and is usually seen carrying a long staff or cane.
  4. Hoteison – A plump Zen Buddhist monk from China, usually seen with a bag in one hand and a fan in the other.
  5. Jurojin – The Taoist god of long life.  This god is also usually seen carrying a staff in his hand.
  6. Benzaiten – The only female of the bunch.  This goddess is from India and is the patron of music and culture.  She is usually seen carrying an old fashioned Japanese biwa (a type of lute).
  7. Bishamonten – The warrior of the bunch.  This god is originally from India and is charged with protecting people and their treasure.  Bishamonten is usually depicted wearing armor.

Size:
Height: 1.0 inches (2.5 centimeters)
Diameter: 2.1 inches (5.5 centimeters)
Weight: 0.3 ounces (8 grams)

Click here to see additional sake items!
Click
here to see other Shichifukujin items!
Click
here to see more fine-quality Japanese ceramics!
Click
here to see additional treasures from Japan!

More about Japanese sake and sake utensils

Sake has long been an important part of Japanese culture.  In the past, sake was considered a very special item, reserved for only the most important occasions, such as weddings, birth celebrations and other auspicious events.  Sake was considered a sacred drink, and accordingly the first glass poured was always offered to the gods before the remainder could be shared among the celebrants.  Sake can be served either warm or cold and special sake flasks are used to both prepare and dispense this unique Japanese drink.  Sake is warmed either by immersing the flask (already filled with sake of course) into warm water until the desired temperature is reached or through the use of a special sake kettle called a choshi.  The latter method however, though common in old Japan, is today usually reserved for ceremonial events only.  Over time, sake utensils, such as cups have developed their own ritual significance which is still evident in modern Japan.  For example, it is today common at Japanese engagement parties for the man and woman to exchange sake cups as a sign of their mutual intent to marry.  Very beautiful sake cups are also given away to celebrate the birth of a child, as these cherished items are considered symbolic of the significance of the new parent-child relationship.  Though normally small in size, sake cups and flasks have long been used in Japan as a medium for the expression of art and calligraphy.  Hand-painted cups and flasks are highly collectable both within and outside Japan and are eagerly sought after by collectors who value their utilitarian nature and artistic splendor.

item code: R3S6B1R11-0004433
category code: SAKECUP
ship code: L1650

Posted by: softypapa | March 14, 2008

Japanese Wooden Sake Cup Shichifukujin Luck God Guinomi

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

men_enjoyin_sake_sample.jpg

Description

This splendid high quality wood and lacquer sake cup (guinomi in Japanese) features a hand-painted image of the Japanese Shinto luck god Hoteison.  This god is a member of the group of seven luck gods called Shichifukujin.  This sake cup was made during the mid to late Japanese Showa period (1926-1989) and is in very good condition with no chips, cracks or large scratches and only small marks from handling and use.  The cup was acquired in the beautiful and historic city of Shizuoka, Japan near the foot of Mt. Fuji.  Click here to see more sake cups!

In Japanese folklore the Shichifukujin are the seven gods of wealth, happiness and longevity.  These famous gods (six male and one female) are frequently seen together in Japanese art, often in a boat sailing the seas of fortune.  However, the individual gods actually hail from a variety of religious faiths including Buddhism and Taoism as well as Japan’s native religion of Shinto.  The gods are:

  1. EbisuEbisu is Japan’s god of fisherman and the morning sun.  Ebisu is also sometimes regarded as the protector of small children, a role he shares with the Buddhist deity JizoEbisu is also the only member of the Shichifukujin seven who is of Japanese origin.
  2. DaikokutenDaikoku is the god of wealth, food and worldly success; and statues of this happy deity have for centuries been common fixtures of Japanese homes, particularly kitchens.  Daikoku is also reputed to be Ebisu’s father.
  3. Fukurokujin – Originating in Chinese Taoism this god is the symbol of wealth, happiness and longevity and is usually seen carrying a long staff or cane.
  4. Hoteison – A plump Zen Buddhist monk from China, usually seen with a bag in one hand and a fan in the other.
  5. Jurojin – The Taoist god of long life.  This god is also usually seen carrying a staff in his hand.
  6. Benzaiten – The only female of the bunch.  This goddess is from India and is the patron of music and culture.  She is usually seen carrying an old fashioned Japanese biwa (a type of lute).
  7. Bishamonten – The warrior of the bunch.  This god is originally from India and is charged with protecting people and their treasure.  Bishamonten is usually depicted wearing armor.

Size:
Height: 1.0 inches (2.5 centimeters)
Diameter: 2.1 inches (5.5 centimeters)
Weight: 0.3 ounces (8 grams)

Click here to see additional sake items!
Click
here to see other Shichifukujin items!
Click
here to see more fine-quality Japanese ceramics!
Click
here to see additional treasures from Japan!

More about Japanese sake and sake utensils

Sake has long been an important part of Japanese culture.  In the past, sake was considered a very special item, reserved for only the most important occasions, such as weddings, birth celebrations and other auspicious events.  Sake was considered a sacred drink, and accordingly the first glass poured was always offered to the gods before the remainder could be shared among the celebrants.  Sake can be served either warm or cold and special sake flasks are used to both prepare and dispense this unique Japanese drink.  Sake is warmed either by immersing the flask (already filled with sake of course) into warm water until the desired temperature is reached or through the use of a special sake kettle called a choshi.  The latter method however, though common in old Japan, is today usually reserved for ceremonial events only.  Over time, sake utensils, such as cups have developed their own ritual significance which is still evident in modern Japan.  For example, it is today common at Japanese engagement parties for the man and woman to exchange sake cups as a sign of their mutual intent to marry.  Very beautiful sake cups are also given away to celebrate the birth of a child, as these cherished items are considered symbolic of the significance of the new parent-child relationship.  Though normally small in size, sake cups and flasks have long been used in Japan as a medium for the expression of art and calligraphy.  Hand-painted cups and flasks are highly collectable both within and outside Japan and are eagerly sought after by collectors who value their utilitarian nature and artistic splendor.

item code: R3S6B1R11-0004432
category code: SAKECUP
ship code: L1650

Posted by: softypapa | February 21, 2008

Japan Daruma Shikishi Art Zen Bodhidarma Sumi-e Nihonga

Shikishi Japanese Art Nihonga Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Shikishi Japanese Art Nihonga Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Shikishi Japanese Art Nihonga Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Shikishi Japanese Art Nihonga Japan Tokaido Softypapa 

Description

Antique Japanese ink and wash painting featuring the image of the Zen Buddhist monk Daruma.  This form of painting is also sometimes called simply ‘wash’ painting and in Japanese is called sumi-e or suibokuga painting.  Using only brush-applied black ink on paper this type of painting was introduced into Japan in the 14th century by Zen Buddhist monks visiting from China.  This type of art is especially well suited to Japanese tastes which tend toward subtle depictions of life and nature often accented with poetry written in beautiful calligraphy.

About the Listed Item

This original Japanese painting (nihonga) dates from the mid to late Japanese Showa period (1926-1989) and was done on a rectangular sheet of stiff Japanese shikishi paper with gold trim at the edges.  The art features a stylized profile of the famous Buddhist monk Daruma, a wandering Indian priest who is credited as the founder of the Zen sect of Buddhism.  This nihonga painting is in poor to fair condition with marks and stains and is a wonderful candidate for framing and display.  Please read below to learn more about Daruma.

Size:
Height: 10.5 inches (27.0 centimeters)
Width: 9.4 inches (24.0 centimeters)

Click here to see other Daruma items!
Click
here to see more Japanese art!
Click
here to see additional treasures from Japan!

More about Daruma

“Life falls down seven times, yet gets up eight…”  This popular Japanese proverb is commonly associated with the Indian Buddhist sage DarumaDaruma is the more familiar name of the historical Buddhist monk Bodhidarma, who lived sometime during the fifth or sixth century AD.  Daruma is credited with the founding of the Zen sect of Buddhism, which he is reputed to have introduced into China during his travels there.  Some of the legends surrounding this figure include tales that he achieved enlightenment or satori only after meditating in a cave for seven years without blinking or moving his eyes.  Another story tells that his enlightenment occurred within a temple in China where he spent his seven years sitting in a room staring at a wall.  Apparently at some point during his long meditation Daruma became so overcome with fatigue that he cut off his eyelids in anger and tossed them to the ground.  These are reputed to have then sprouted into China’s first green tea plants!  It is said that Daruma’s long meditation caused his arms and legs to wither and fall off, leaving him as an armless, legless and eyelidless (yet enlightened) Bodhidarma…  The Japanese love this story and admire Daruma for his spirit and determination, and each new year many Japanese will buy a paper-mache Daruma tumbler doll in order to enlist its services in helping them persevere towards their own goals or achievements.  The dolls are sold with unpainted eyes, allowing the new owner to paint in one eye to symbolize the start of a new goal or venture.  The doll is then placed in a prominent place within the home or at work in order to remind the owner to keep after their aim.  Japanese students especially utilize Daruma to motivate them with their studies; placing a one-eyed Daruma before them on their desk as motivation to work hard and make the grade.  Only after the goal is achieved will the owner then paint in the second eye, symbolizing a realized goal.  Daruma dolls which have completed their jobs as perseverance role models are normally then brought to a temple to be burned during special ceremonies set aside for this purpose.  The last images below are various representations of Daruma found at a Zen temple near our home in Japan.

item code: R3S1B1-0004094
category code: nihonga
ship code: shikishihako

Older Posts »

Categories